This easy to make SLIME will gross you out in the BEST way!

Our friend, Professor Figgy, shares his recipe for the ooey-gooeyiest GLOW SLIME imaginable!


You will need:

Tools and Materials:

Plastic or glass container

Needle-nose pliers

Standard highlighter

Water

Latex gloves

Mixing bowl

Jar (with lid)

Elmer's School Glue Gel

Craft sticks

Borax

  1. Start by making “glow water.” Fill container with 2 cups hot water.
  2. With pliers, pull out felt writing tip and carefully pry off bottom of highlighter and remove felt ink tube from inside.
  3. Place both the felt ink tube and the writing tip in the hot water and let sit for 4 to 6 hours.
  4. Once water has cooled and ink has saturated the solution, use gloved hands to squeeze any remaining ink out of the felt tube. Discard highlighter pieces.
  5. To make slime, create one solution in a bowl by combining 1/3 cup glow water with the entire contents of a 4 oz. bottle of Elmer's School Glue Gel. Stir mixture with craft stick until thoroughly combined.
  6. To the jar, add 3/4 cups glow water and 2 teaspoons Borax. Secure lid tightly on and shake mixture until borax dissolves as much as possible.
  7. Pour solution from jar into mixture in bowl, stirring continuously with a craft stick.
  8. Once solutions are combined, remove the resulting glob from the bowl and work it in your hands for 3 to 5 minutes until it comes together and is less wet and slimy.
  9. Store your slime in a resealable plastic bag or air-tight container.
  10. Slime will “glow” under black light!

TIP:

Science Behind the Project: When mixed with water, Borax creates an alkaline (basic) solution that reacts with glue to loosely tie its long molecules together, producing a putty-like material called a polymer. In simplest terms, a polymer is a long chain of molecules. Everyday materials like the plastic used to make soda bottles and the nylon fabric in a windbreaker are made up of polymers. The slime glows under black light because the ink in highlighters (that is in the glow water) contains a chemical called pyranine that is a phosphor, which absorbs radiation (like ultraviolet light from the black light) and emits it back as visible light.
Photography by Susanna Blavarg

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