Herb salt couldn’t be much simpler, but the final result is a definite crowd pleaser.


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From Michaela Hayes of Crock & Jar:


Ah, the herbs of summer! My garden is not complete without rosemary, basil, lemon verbena, lavender, and lots and lots of thyme. Stepping outside—or climbing

out the window of my current Manhattan apartment—to snip some fresh herbs to add to the meal of the moment is a magical experience.

When my wife and I got married a few years ago, we decided to make the wedding favors ourselves. We couldn’t decide on just one, so we picked three. And of course they were all food-centric. We made mulberry syrup, with mulberries we foraged from the park where we got married; lemon verbena and mint tea, made from herbs we harvested on the farm where Jane apprenticed in California; and we made herb salt, from herbs we grew on our deck farm in Brooklyn. People told us stories about how they were using the herb salt on everything, then we heard stories about how they were rationing it, and finally, we got requests for more, please!

Herb salt couldn’t be much simpler, but the final result is a definite crowd pleaser, adding that little extra something when used as a finishing salt, or deepening the flavor when used to season. And it can be a hyper local food product that you can make with little more space than a window box, or a single bag purchase at the farmers market.

The trick to a good herb salt is to use a very sharp knife. Then cut through the herbs as few times as possible. The more you cut them, the more likely you are to bruise them and cause them to turn black. Also, mixing the herbs with the salt as soon as they are cut will lessen the amount that they oxidize.

Single origin herb salts are wonderful—I
love a simple basil salt. Or you can mix it up with a blend of salt using a variety of herbs. One of my go-to mixes is thyme, rosemary, oregano, and basil.

 


MAKES 1 CUP

You will need:

1 cup good quality sea salt (I used Maldon)


1⁄2 cup tender herbs (like basil or tarragon)

1⁄4 cup hearty herbs (like rosemary and thyme)


  1. Place salt in a wide bowl.
  2. Using a very sharp knife, mince the herbs. As you finish cutting each batch of herbs, mix them into the salt.
  3. ay the mixed herbs and salt out on a parchment-lined baking sheet in a dry spot in your home.
  4. Mix the herb salt occasionally and allow it to dry for about a day (or longer if it is very humid or you are making a larger batch).
  5. Once the herbs are completely dry, store the salt in an airtight container and enjoy!

TIP:

The trick to a good herb salt is to use a very sharp knife. Then cut through the herbs as few times as possible. The more you cut them, the more likely you are to bruise them and cause them to turn black.


Photography by Paul "Sweet Paul" Lowe

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