Nanaimo bars originated in British Colombia. Decadent layers of chocolatey almond and coconut flecked crust, rich custard filling, and topped with a hard chocolate shell.


This recipe comes from our friend Karen Odenwald, a cook at the iconic Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise in Alberta, Canada.





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I used my krumkake iron to make these pizzelle but you can use a tradiitonal pizzelle iron instead if you like.  It's very common to flavor pizzelle with anise. If you want, you can add a drop or two of anise oil to give them a beautiful liquorice flavor.

16 Bars

BOTTOM LAYER:
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup sugar
5 tbsp. cocoa powder
1 beaten egg
1 1/4 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/2 cup finely chopped almonds
1 cup coconut

SECOND LAYER:
1/2 cup softened unsalted butter
2 Tbsp. plus 2 tsp. cream
2 Tbsp. vanilla custard powder
2 cups icing sugar

THIRD LAYER:
6 oz. semi-sweet chocolate
3 Tbsp. unsalted butter
  1. For the bottom layer, melt the butter, sugar, and cocoa in a double boiler.
  2. Add the beaten egg and stir until everything thickens. Remove from heat.
  3. Stir in graham cracker crumbs, almonds, and coconut. (if you want you can first pulse all three of these items together in a food processor to get them very finely chopped up!)
  4. Press firmly into ungreased 8 X 8 inch pan.
  5. For the second layer cream together all ingredients and beat on medium until light and fluffy.
  6. Spread evenly over the bottom layer and put in the refrigerator or freezer to set for at least 20 minutes.
  7. For the third layer melt chocolate chips and butter over low heat. Allow to cool until it's just warm and still spreadable. If it's too hot it will melt the custard layer when you try to spread it.
  8. Spread chocolate evenly over the second layer and refrigerate until totally cold and set.
  9. To serve, have a large knife soaking in HOT water, wipe it dry, and make each cut, heating up the knife between each cut. They're VERY rich, so you might want to cut them on the small side.

TIP:

Photography by Paul "Sweet Paul" Lowe

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